Fanshawe partners with two Ont. colleges to strengthen film and TV industry

Cameras and a gree screen. CREDIT: EMMA BUTLER
Credentials offered through this partnership include grip and lighting, TV and film production accounting basic skills, previsualization, media organization for unscripted TV, location sound, and much more.

Centennial, Fanshawe and Seneca colleges have collaborated with industry partners to respond to the skills shortage in Ontario’s screen-based industries. This is a one of a kind collaboration, that creates eight film and television production microcredentials. The programs were created to help current students and industry professionals to learn additional in-demand production and technology skills.

“Drawing on the collective resources of our three colleges was essential in developing this diverse package of microcredentials, aimed at upskilling the workforce for the film and television industries. With production booming in Toronto, this training will provide much needed talent development to address labour shortages and prepare workers for new opportunities in this rapidly changing field,” said Rob Carver, Associate Dean, School of Contemporary Media at Fanshawe in a statement.

Employers are reporting difficulty finding qualified workers with up-to-date skills in the industry, standard technologies, with film and television production reaching record levels in Ontario. “The television and film industry, and related digital industries, are growing rapidly in the Greater Toronto Area,” stated Nate Horowitz, Dean of School of Communications, Media, Arts and Design at Centennial College in a statement. “To keep up with this growth and career opportunities for our students, Centennial College is proud to collaborate with Fanshawe and Seneca, through the Government of Ontario’s Challenge fund, in the development of discrete microcredentials that absolutely meet today’s industry needs, tomorrow’s changing requirements and key labour shortages.”

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The courses will be taught and led by respected industry professionals and will be offered online as well as in person. Credentials offered through this partnership include grip and lighting, TV and film production accounting basic skills, previsualization, media organization for unscripted TV, location sound, and much more.

“This suite of microcredentials gives students a real advantage in developing the skills that will lead them to employment in Ontario’s screen-based industries,” said Kurt Muller, Dean, Faculty of Communication, Art and Design at Seneca in a statement.

These eight film and television microcredentials will be funded from the Ministry of Colleges and Universities Challenge Fund, also with the support of industry partners Avid, The Stratagem Group and Unity. POV is also partnering on the project. POV, a youth film and media training network, will help members of equity-deserving groups access the microcredentials and diversity representation in Ontario’s screen-based industries.

“The best thing any student can do to learn the skills and earn the credentials in any field is to take one of our full-time certificate or diploma programs,” said Carver. “Microcredentials are great for students because they can be taken concurrently with their full-time studies and go deeper on a particular subject. Microcredentials will also be a great resource for students after they graduate to keep up-to-date as industries evolve.” At Fanshawe, the application process will not change for diplomas and certificate programs. Applying for the microcredentials will be very easy in comparison. Students apply directly to Fanshawe, and applications are processed quickly. The hours of delivery and costs for the microcredentials are also much less than an applicant would face for a full-time program.

These three colleges will see more students come the new school years, as this adds to the overall programs each college has. All participants involved in creating these microcredentials have high hope for the future. To say the least, this will help fill the gap within the screen-based industries that are in high demand across Ontario.